OVERVIEW

Introduction to the idea of lines as edges, and oil pastel technique with mixing & blending. Students use a photo of a scotty dog bas-relief sculpture for reference, but it’s turned upside down. This allows it to be drawn more accurately because it’s hard for the mind to interpret. Instead of using known assumptions about what you’re seeing, your eyes have to look more closely.

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Grades K – 1

1 Hour & 30 Minutes, or two 45-minute sessions

STANDARDS For This Lesson

SUBMIT YOUR SUMMARY

Copy and paste the text below to send your abbreviated lesson plan with national standards and learning targets to your supervisors and colleagues. Or access the WORD doc by using the blue button below.

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OVERVIEW:

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NATIONAL STANDARDS:

Grade XX

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Grade XX

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Grade XX

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LEARNING TARGETS:

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LESSON PLAN:

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Tap the Plus Icon (above right) to open STANDARDS information, including an Overview, Learning Targets and a Syllabus. Copy and paste to send to your Administrators or use the button below to download a Word document with the same information that you can add your info to and email to them as an attachment.

Student Work

SCROLL & TEACH LESSON PLAN

Don’t worry about rewriting anything. Just spend a few minutes reading the lesson plan and printing out your PDFs. Then check out the READY, SET, GO! section and print your prep-page, which includes checklists and an “at a glance” outline of the lesson so you can stay on track when you’re teaching. Set out the materials from the list on your prep page and you’re ready.

That’s all you need to know. Use your smartphone to Scroll & Teach!

Lesson At A Glance

A brief overview of each step. Buttons jump to each section for detailed information.

20 Minutes – Artists’ Choice on paper with pencil or oil pastels.

15 Min – Talk about tickle lines & loud lines.

10 Min – Use Flag to explain how lines can show edges

15 Min – Students draw from reference photos

10 Min – Demonstrate blending pastels

18 Min –  Artists color and blend their dogs

2 Min – Everyone helps!

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SCROLL & TEACH

LESSONPLAN

Each section is a different color. Read over once and then you can SCROLL & TEACH using any device you like. It’s designed to work best with your phone.

STEP 1. Warm Up

Students will start with Artists' Choice
20 Minutes

LEARNING TARGETS

Students learn to express themselves through creating from their imagination.

M A T E R I A L S

  • 11″ x 17″ Copy Paper
  • 4B pencil
  • Eraser
  • Markers
  • Paper Towels
All materials are suggestions and may be modified as you see fit. We have tried many items, and these seem to allow the most versatility for the cost.

1.1 greet

Greet students as they come in and help them choose a chair.

Kneel down so that you are on their level. Bending over emphasizes the differences in your height, while kneeling makes them feel more important. Have tape and marker ready so you can stick some tape on the table by each student and write their name on it as they sit down.

1.2 choice

Encourage students to work with one piece of paper for a while. If someone uses the phrase, “free draw”, explain that artists’ choice is something only artists can do, while free-draw is something anyone can do. You want to use the phrase to elevate the students’ expectations of their work.

Everyone should take their time with the work and make a finished piece of art. Limiting the paper can also help kids focus on the work. If someone finishes in super-fast time, ask them what more they can do to the existing paper. Ask again several times – unless they appear overly frustrated; then you can allow them to move on to a new work.

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STEP 2. Tickle Lines Game

Students will play a fun game to practice drawing lines
15 Minutes

LEARNING TARGETS

Students know how to create different expressive lines

M A T E R I A L S

  • 11″ x 17″ copy paper
  • 2B Pencils
  • White Erasers
“In a minute we’ll play a little game, but first we need to practice.

Hold the sheet of paper in front of you in a bathtub position, and fold it in half like a book. Open it back up, and draw a circle on the left-hand side. We are going to call this a loud circle, and this will be our loud side. Don’t draw anything yet on the other side. We are going to call it our (change your voice to a whisper) whisper side. Everyone whisper your name. It’s very quiet and hard to hear a whisper, but if you have a quiet room you can hear me just fine.

Before we actually draw, let’s pretend to draw a quiet, whisper circle on the right side. Here’s how to do it.  Just hold your pencil above your paper without even touching it! Move your pencil in the air, slowly around and around. As you get better and better at making circles, gently, slowly lower your pencil until it barely touches the paper. It should just tickle the paper, and make the lightest line you’ve ever seen. We call these lines tickle lines sometimes. Practice drawing another circle and see if you can make it even lighter!”

Teacher Talk

Read verbatim or paraphrase

2.1 draw

Have them practice more if needed. Get a new sheet of paper and fold this sheet just like the last one. Tell students to write their name on the loud side in loud line, and again on the whisper side in light tickle lines, but do not draw on it at all yet.

Once you get started, play music, and adjust the volume back and forth from loud to quiet and make it fun!

“Now we’re going to play that fun game. It’s not the kind of game where you win or lose, but more of an art game, that helps us have fun in art class

We’re going to play some music. When the music is loud, draw on the left side, with normal bold lines. But when the music gets very soft, everyone should change over to the right side, and draw in those very light tickle lines, and also whisper when you talk. You should write your name on both sides too, in loud or whisper lines depending on the music. Then you can also draw shapes or pictures if you want, as long as the music continues. Remember to change sides when the music changes. We’ll begin on the loud, left side.”

Teacher Talk

Read verbatim or paraphrase

2.2 draw

Have fun and help them remember to switch sides and draw lighter and darker. When finished, have everyone erase one line on the whisper side and one line on the loud side.

“See how the whisper line can disappear like magic? Magic whisper lines are what artists sometimes use to draw with, before they are ready to finish with real, normal lines. You can try using some magic whisper lines for our next project. It’s ok if you don’t use them, because it takes a lot of practice to make magic whisper lines when you want to. Don’t worry about it for now unless you just want to. “
Teacher Talk

Read verbatim or paraphrase

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STEP 3. Lines & Shapes

Students will review colors and shapes by looking at flags
10 Minutes

LEARNING TARGETS

Students know how to observe shapes and use lines to show edges in artwork

M A T E R I A L S

  • 11″ x 17″ copy paper
  • 2B Pencil
  • White Eraser
  • Scotty Dog reference
  • Scotty Dog Lineart
  • Flags from previous lesson

3.1 Print

Reference

Scotty Dog

Reference photos should be cut apart. Print on regular copy paper.

Hand out reference prints. Have one for each student, or for two students to share.

PRINT


1 Page – Opens in new window

3.1 Print

Example

Scotty Dog Lineart

An outlined version to use as an example, and also to trace if needed for some students.

Print enough of these so two students can share viewing it.

PRINT

1 Page – Opens in new window

3.2 Teach

Use the flag from last week to explain the way artists use lines to show where edges are.

Show your flag example from the previous lesson, and review the colors and shapes from last week so any new students don’t feel left out.

Have all the kids do a quick drawing in pencil of your flag (or they can draw their own flag from memory if they prefer). Encourage them to erase with a white eraser if they need to.

As they work and finish up, explain the difference between shapes and lines and how artists use line to show edges.

Set the scotty dog statue photos up, where everyone can see one, and point out the edges. get them thinking about lines for the dog’s fur, eyes, nose, etc.

You can show them the lineart version now if you want, or save it for the next step.

“See the big shapes in my flag? I want everyone to draw my flag’s big shapes on your paper, or you can draw your own flag from last week if you remember it. ”

“How did we make the edges of the big shapes on the flags? With scissors. We cut the shapes out. How can you tell where the shape edge actually is on my flag right here? You can see the edge because that’s where the color changes. We can show edges with color, but what about showing edges when you’re drawing? What are you using right now to show the edges?

Lines! Artists use lines even though they aren’t always really seeing them. There aren’t lines on my flag, but when you use lines, you can make a nice drawing of my flag without having to color it. Sometimes line drawings are really neat looking. Sometimes artists use only lines to make artwork, and sometimes they use both lines and color together. We’re going to use lines and color together today. We’ll begin with the lines. “

Teacher Talk

Read verbatim or paraphrase

BREAK

This is the end of part one if you are dividing into two, 45-minute sessions.

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STEP 4. Dog Drawing

Students will draw a scotty dog upside-down from reference
15 Minutes

LEARNING TARGETS

Students know how to draw from reference

M A T E R I A L S

  • 8.5″ x 11″ card stock
  • 2B Pencils
  • White Eraser

4.1 explain

Set out the dog photos – upside down – and have the students draw it.

Make fun of how he likes to stand on his head. Entertain the kids a bit. You should have the statue photo on cheasels with photos; all turned upside down. Have an outline print ready for each student but don’t show it just yet.

“What is wrong with Scotty Dog? He is always wanting to stand on his head. (No, we are not going to stand on our heads today in art class because we have lots of art projects to finish). Standing on your head is fun sometimes, but Scotty Dog just can’t seem to get right-side up today. Let’s draw him upside down. It’s funny, but sometimes artists like to practice drawing things upside down because it helps them see shapes better.

Look at the shape of the whole dog. Look at the shape of the head. See if you can draw the biggest shapes using a magic whisper line if you can. Then draw smaller shapes like the head. Finally, draw the smallest shapes last, like ears, eyes, fur lines and tail.”

Teacher Talk

Read verbatim or paraphrase

4.2 draw

Play music while they draw from the reference.

 

This can help them concentrate and also mask your individual conversations with students. Don’t mention whisper lines more than once, maybe twice so there’s no pressure. If someone does them very well, praise them quietly. It should not be a big public issue so others feel inferior, yet not too small an issue for artists who can accomplish it so they do get some praise.

After they get the basic shapes, you can then place the Scotty Dog Lineart drawing upside down on the cheasels too, as an example.

IMPORTANT AID: If they are having a lot of trouble getting the drawing to work, start over and let struggling students trace the lineart print (still upside down) on regular weight copy paper so they can see through it. (Tape them down so that the paper doesn’t slide and mess up the drawing half-way through.)

4.3 redraw

Re-drawing the lines with bold black markers is great training and looks good too.

When they’re finished, turn everything right-side up, and hand out a black marker for each student. Let them draw over the pencil lines with the bold black marker in LOUD lines. This helps them feel like they did a pretty good job with the pencil, and establishes that bold lines are sometimes just what the artwork needs.

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STEP 5. DEMO

Students will gather and watch a demo of oil pastels
10 Minutes

LEARNING TARGETS

Students know how to blend oil pastels

M A T E R I A L S

  • 8.5″ x 11″ copy paper
  • Oil Pastels
  • Paper towels
  • Blender sticks (optional)
How To Paint with Oil Pastels (tap any image to open viewer)

5.1 demo

Have kids gather around the end of a table and watch you demonstrate blending the pastels.

Look at the slideshow above for how to demonstrate the oil pastels and how to explain each step. Instead of blender sticks, you can use paper towels to blend. Blender sticks need to be cleaned every now and then with a sandpaper board.

If you have previous students who already know how, you can ask a question and they can help by answering one question. Set up with a full set of colors, paper towels, and a scotty dog line drawing print.

“First, I want you to notice how I’ve divided my scotty dog into 6 or 7 areas. Each will be a different color, because we’re going to make a tie-dyed scotty dog!

These oil pastels can do a lot of different things. It depends on how you use them. If you just draw a line like this… it looks like a very bright crayon line. It’s prettier than crayon, but still similar. If you color with them, you get the same crayon-like look. But look what happens when you color over an area with a color that is close to the first color, but a little different. Like yellow over green, or light blue over dark blue. You see how the colors begin to mix? This is a different look. When you move and combine your pastels if different ways, it is called technique. I’ve used 2 techniques so far. Here’s a third: I can dab tiny little bits of color and then dab more of the second color. The colors don’t mix as much.

We can make this look even more different by doing two more techniques. One is when you add white to a color or to more than one color already mixed. Look what white does! It begins to look like paint instead of crayon now. The last technique I want to show you is using a paper towel. You can twist it and use the end to rub and smear the colors together. It’s a lot like using white and the colors smear together, but white also make the colors get lighter while paper towels do not.

See how I’ve blended some reds, oranges and yellows in this area? Then I’ve blended blues, greens and purples in other areas. These are hot colors and cold colors. Today, do not try and blend any hot color with a cold color. That makes a brownish color. Today we want that tie-dyed scotty dog! That means keeping hot with hot and cold with cold so they are bright. We don’t want any browns. If you’re unsure, ask for help with the colors to mix.”

Teacher Talk

Read verbatim or paraphrase

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STEP 6. Blending Colors

Students will practice blending oil pastels
18 Minutes

LEARNING TARGETS

Students know how to blend oil pastels

M A T E R I A L S

  • 8.5″ x 11″ copy paper
  • Oil Pastels

6.1 Create

Let them color and blend while you play music and help students individually. 

Take care to pay attention to the quiet ones, and tell the classroom that you’re choosing to help the quiet ones who are working hard or kids who raise their hands for help. Try to ignore kids who follow you around for help, use finger taps while saying your name over and over, and when kids are calling out repeatedly to get attention. Gently steer them back to sitting in seats, raising hands, and waiting for turns.

Make sure all the work has names, and take pictures as soon as students finish any work.

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STEP 7. Cleanup

Everyone helps
2 Minutes

LEARNING TARGETS

Students know the importance of cleaning up

M A T E R I A L S

  • Paper Towels
  • Cleaning wipes
  • Sink
  • Waste baskets
  • Well-lit spot for photos
  • Camera or phone-camera

7.1 clean

Students clean up their work area.

  • Wash hands
  • Super-wash brushes if used
  • Put art supplies away
  • Wipe tables & toss trash
  • Remove any smocks (last)
  • Check for items on floors and tables

7.2 photos

Try to get photos of your student’s artwork. Find a good spot for quick lighting without highlights or shadows from your hands and device. Ideally in-between two strong lights on each side

7.1 connect

Make sure you see the kids connect with parents and tell them about the class if you can!
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READY, SET, GO!

The information you need to make your lesson work

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Insights

This lesson provides understanding

%

Technique

This lesson shows application and movement

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Self Expression

This lesson allows personal freedom

OBJECTIVES

  • Practice and improvement in drawing & working with color
  • Understanding differences between shapes, lines and tickle lines (guide lines)
  • Accomplishment in creating a colored drawing
  • Fulfillment by by choosing colors to use in a new way

TROUBLESPOTS

Impatience with Lesson Concepts – This lesson may be a little advanced for some of your students, but it will still be fun even if they don’t apply the concepts at all. Just LET IT GO. It’s always more important for artists to have fun than to improve on someone else’s schedule.

“Every artist must improve themselves at their own pace, when they are internally ready. Anything else will only frustrate them.” Dennas Davis, ArtSquish founder

Drawing right side up – We try to draw the dog upside-down, but some students will not know how to use their eyes, due to developmental changes, and draw a right-side up Scotty Dog. Some just don’t like to draw it upside-down. Either way, just let that go and say something like, “you chose a different way to do it. Artists sometimes do things differently.” Just try not to encourage that, and maybe later remind kids that sometimes it’s important to follow directions to learn a certain thing.

Frustration – It may not come up this early in the year with 1st and 2nd graders, but as artists get older, they notice that their work doesn’t look like they expected. Age 8 and up artists are always creating work they don’t like, and that makes them feel bad about themselves. It is extremely important to catch this moment when young people make the developmental shift into seeing realism in their work – and the lack of it. There is often a crisis of realization and you are there to guide them through it.

Many people believe that “real artists don’t practice”. Nothing could be further from the truth! Explain to anyone who is frustrated, using something like the following.

ART WORDS

Blending – When you use a blender, towel, or even a finger, to smear oil pastels together. This makes them look like paint.

Line – Artists use lines to show the edges of shapes.

Shape – blobs, circles, triangles and rectangles that are either outlined, or shown by different colors, in your artwork..

Tickle Lines –

When an artist wants to know where to begin drawing, and to see the big shapes easier, it’s helpful to do a few guide lines, or tickle lines. Sometimes we’ll call them disappearing or magic lines in cartoon classes.

It’s important to realize that these are not artwork lines. They are light and simple – without any detail at all – because they only point the way for the artist to do the real lines. It’s a little bit like tracing.

The reason they are called tickle lines is that your pencil barely touches the paper, which is like you’re tickling the paper as opposed to a loud and dark artistic line. Lines that are drawn very lightly the first time, are the only kinds of lines that can be erased, and really disappear after you’re finished with your art.

CLASSROOM

PREP

Practice the demo so you don’t have to stop and think too much. Get a flag from last week ready to use as a reference.

Print all of your PDFs from the lesson plan and cut any references apart as needed.

What your room needs

Here are your printable lists and room prep instructions.

PRINT

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CLASSROOM

MATERIALS

  • 8.5″ x 11″ copy paper
  • 8.5″ x 11″ card stock
  • 11″ x 17″ copy paper
  • 4B & 2B Pencils
  • Erasers
  • Flag from last week’s lesson if possible
  • Music to play
  • Blender sticks (stumps)
  • Paper towels
  • Smocks

PREVIEW

Week #

Month 1 – 5

Students will learn cool stuff.

Week #

Month 1 – 5

Students will learn cool stuff.

Use this button to view our parent’s blog. Share the link: http://parentart.org, with your student’s parents so your they can read about the lesson each week.